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of those worries about the fiscal cliff and maybe slower growth in trust economy, the stock market has had a great year. too bad you missed out. the smart money has been in the market. the rest of us have been worried about the fiscal cliff. >> number eight, facebook's ipo, hundreds of millions of people like facebook, but investors did not on its first day as a public company. trading glitches at the nasdaq and questions about the company's ability to make money on mobile users, pummeled the stock, which is on its way back to the ipo price. >>> number seven, mother myer. the new ceo of yahoo! who announced she was just going to take a two-week maternity leave. >> number six, mother nature, an intense drought in the midwest that scorched the corn and soy crop sending prices sky high. >> the ocean is just beyond. >> and who can forget superstorm sandy? millions of neighbors, their houses swept away without power, damages, and raising questions about infrastructure and whether we should be spending some money to fix it. >>> number five, china, is china slowing or leading the world? we do kno
, that if the u.s. were to really go over the u.s. fiscal cliff that the economy would go back into recession, unemployment would go from 7% to over 9%. that thousands of people would lose their jobs? >> no, wolf. i don't think there would be a permanent situation where we went over the fiscal cliff and nothing was done. my point is that if we went over the fiscal cliff and tax rates went up and spending cuts were substantial, that republicans would be under a huge pressure, even greater pressure than they are now to agree to a democratic initiative to cut middle class taxes and also restore the spending cuts that really do need to be restored. especially for the middle class and the poor. under the present circumstances, we to some extent have the worst of both worlds. the president loses the bargaining advantage of having that fiscal cliff and also having the public behind him. and has given in to republican demands of moving that threshold from $250,000 over $450,000. >> we've got to leave it there. grover norquist and robert reich, thanks to both of you. i know you'll be joining us later
is the fiscal cliff impasse. it's a potentially devastating one-two bunch for the u.s. economy. neither the longshore's union or alliance shipping company would allow anyone to speak on camera. but officials knowledgeable of the negotiations say it boils down to one issue. the key sticking point is the payments that the longshore men get for them. they pay royalties for the containers based on their weight but the shipping companies want to freeze those royalty payments for current longshore men and eliminate them for future hires. the longshore men say the royalties are made to make up for automation. but if the shipping companies lockout the longshore men -- >> that would impact more than containers. that would impact all cargos at ports. that would have a much more impactful reaction. $55 billion worth of cargo in an average month this year. candy? >> brian, i have to imagine retail companies and others who want those goods off the ships and in their stores have to be plenty worried. do they have a plan b to move those goods if there's a strike? >> reporter: yes. some of them do. clo
. you're in "the situation room." the u.s. is now just six days away from the so-called fiscal cliff. and a mad scramble is on here in washington to avoid the drastic tax hikes and spending cuts that many fear will plunge the economy back into recession. president obama flies back from hawaii tonight to be ready if the senate comes back with a plan when it returns to work tomorrow. and house leaders are huddling with members on stand-by to return. senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following all of it for us. what are you hearing? >> there was a conference call of course members of the house leadership even, they're back in their districts, but there was a conference call today among those house republican leaders trying to figure out if and when the house should come back into session. two republican sources tell me they did not make a decision on this call. it's still up in the air. and a big reason for that is if anything can get done in the next six days, the ball is in the senate's court. the capitol is a ghost town. neither chamber in session. an eerie calm since t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4